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The Logan Philadelphia, Curio Collection by Hilton

One Logan Square, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 19103, USA TEL: +1-215-963-1500 FAX: +1-215-963-9506
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The Logan Philadelphia Art Gallery

Welcome

The Logan Philadelphia with over 50 original pieces, all created by artists with close ties to Philadelphia and also inspired by the beating heart of the city's history, our locally curated art collection sets this cosmopolitan property apart from other hotels in the city and the Curio collection. This art collection is unusual, inventive, unconventional, exciting and 100% Philadelphia.

For more information on The Logan Artwork, download the Logan Hotel Art Tour App from your app store.

Philadelphia Elite Silhouettes

by Traction Company


Location: Lobby

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Philadelphia Elite Silhouettes

by Traction Company

The curator worked with the Historical Society of Pennsylvania to source over 300 images for this chandelier celebrating famous Philadelphians across history. The photographs of these Philadelphians suspend from a tri-layer steel figure 8, created by Traction Company's Brendan Keen, reflective of the 8 pieces of the snake from the "Join or Die" political cartoon created by Benjamin Franklin. Among the Philadelphians included are Louisa May Alcott, beloved author of Little Women; Edgar Allen Poe, writer; Joe Frazer, boxer; Walt Whitman, famed poet; and Marian Anderson, first African American to perform with the New York Metropolitan Opera. Other notables include: James Logan, David Rittenhouse & Stephen Girard.


Hombre de Hierro

by Miguel Horn


Location: Lobby

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Hombre de Hierro

by Miguel Horn

Hombre de Hierro is a topographical construction of CNC plasma-cut steel plates, stacked to form the image of a man standing with his arms folded. The piece honors the men and women who shaped Philadelphia's industrial history through innovation and craftsmanship. As the city re-imagines itself as a hub for culture and innovation, the grit that characterized its inhabitants prevails. Considering past and present, Miguel Horn integrated traditional and contemporary fabrication methods to create Hombre de Hierro. This sculpture is the embodiment of the city built by industry and formed by innovation. Hombre de Hierro stands silently commanding a presence of the lobby and its guests. Our very own "Logan Man".


The Golden Gun

by Len Den Dulk


Location: Library

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The Golden Gun

by Len Den Dulk

The Pennsylvania Rifled Musket was one of the first commonly used rifles for hunting and warfare. It is characterized by an unusually long barrel, which is widely believed to be a largely unique development of American rifles. Rifled firearms saw their first major combat usage in the American colonies during the Seven Years war, and later the American Revolution in the eighteenth century.


$100 Quilt

by Theodore Gray


Location: Grange

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$100 Quilt

by Theodore Gray

The first US Mint was built in 1792, when Philadelphia was still the U.S. capital, and began operation in 1793. The Philadelphia Mint was responsible for nearly all official proof coinage. Philadelphia is also the site of master die production for U.S. coinage, and the engraving and design departments of the Mint are also located here. David Rittenhouse, notable Philadelphian, was the first director of the U.S. Mint.


Join or Die

by Morgan Dummitt


Location: Elevator Foyer

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Join or Die

by Morgan Dummitt

"Join, or Die" is a well-known political cartoon, created by Benjamin Franklin and first published in his Pennsylvania Gazette on May 9, 1754. It is a woodcut showing a snake cut into eighths, and each segment is labeled with the initials of one of the thirteen American colonies. Pennsylvania is represented in the center with an "R", a typo in the original 1754 print. Franklin's purpose for the original cartoon was to encourage the colonists to join together with Great Britain in the Seven Years War. Ironically, the cartoon was used again decades later against the British in the American Revolutionary War. Traction Company's Morgan Dummitt created and installed this interpretation of the classic cartoon in the elevator foyer.


Crest

by Dawn Kramlich


Location: Outside of the Commons Restroom

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Crest

by Dawn Kramlich

The Pennsylvania coat of arms features a shield crested by an American bald eagle, flanked by horses, and adorned with symbols of Pennsylvania's strengths- The Symbol of Philadelphia-A ship carrying state commerce to all parts of the world. A clay-red plough, a symbol of Pennsylvania's rich natural resources; and three golden sheaves of wheat, representing fertile fields and Pennsylvania's wealth of human thought and action. An olive branch and cornstalk cross limbs beneath-symbols of peace and prosperity. The state motto, "Virtue, Liberty and Independence", appears festooned below. Atop the coat of arms is a bald eagle, representing Pennsylvania's loyalty to the United States.


Crew

by Traction Company


Location: Upper Lobby

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Crew

by Traction Company

Boathouse Row in Philadelphia hosts many major important rowing regattas and the boathouses are seen as centers of the rowing community around the United States. Much like the synchronous efforts of a Crew team, the making of the sculpture, "Crew", was a collaborative endeavor by Traction Company artists John Greig, Steven Daily & Leila Bateman, who designed a team of rowers that exemplify the traditions and values of the sport in this historic city. Each of the artists brought their own vision and aesthetic. The individual artists can be seen in the hand-bent and individually formed pieces that make up the nine figures. Though each figure has his own personality and gesture, the team as a whole projects strength and unity. The use of blackened steel and abstract figuration bring that tradition of strength and brotherhood into a modern context. Boathouse Row is located alongside the iconic Kelly Drive, named after famed Philadelphia rower John B. Kelly, Jr., father to American Olympic rower Jack Kelly and Grace Kelly, iconic movie actress and Princess of Monaco.


In A Woman's Mind

by Jayne Surrena


Location: Urban Farmer Women's Restroom

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In A Woman's Mind

by Jayne Surrena

The photographic collages have such appeal due to the combination of humor and visual storytelling. The simple, unclouded assemblages draw the viewer in as they find connections with each piece. This Philadelphia artist's work has appeared in multiple publications, galleries and projects worldwide. Some highlights include Gawker, Art Basel Miami, The Wall Breakers, Philadelphia Stories, Art Takes Times Square, Art Newspaper, Art Scene News, Uncommon Goods, Aint-Bad Magazine and The Paris Review.


Quills of Monticello

by Chris Nelke


Location: Monticello

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Quills of Monticello

by Chris Nelke

Thomas Jefferson bred special geese to keep feathers for writing implements. Because of their shape, only the five feathers at the tip of the left wing would do.


Meet Me at the Eagle

by Liz Heras


Location: Urban Farmer Men's Restroom

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Meet Me at the Eagle

by Liz Heras

Based on German sculptor August Gaul's 2,500-pound bronze bird that came to America for the Louisiana Purchase Exposition in 1904. When John Wanamaker purchased it for his famous department store, he had to strengthen the floor with extra girders. Soon "Meet me at the eagle" became a catchphrase for Philadelphians as well as suburbanites who came downtown to shop.


Bank Robbery I, II

by Len Den Dulk


Location: Mount Vernon Foyer

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Bank Robbery I, II

by Len Den Dulk

Abstract wall hanging based on a Dye Pack, inspiration taken from Philadelphia's history of currency.


I Can Not Tell A Lie I-IV

by Chris Nelke


Location: Mount Vernon

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I Can Not Tell A Lie I-IV

by Chris Nelke

George Washington is often noted for stating "I cannot tell a lie," in a short story about him chopping down a cherry tree as a boy. This piece is inspired by that famous line.


Spa Art

by Various Artists


Location: The Spa at the Logan

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Spa Art

by Various Artists

These series of pieces were chosen for the spa as they reflect subdued parts of the human body, combined with the pastoral scenery found throughout Pennsylvania. Pictured here are Surreal Countryside I (photo 1) and Title #3 (Photo 2), both by Elizabeth LaGumina.


Philadelphia Textile

by John Johnson


Location: Lower Level Foyer

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Philadelphia Textile

by John Johnson

Pennsylvania became the leader in textile manufacturing between 1870 and 1900. In cotton and silk goods, Philadelphia specialized in intricate and embellished fabrics, frequently woven on a handloom. By 1900, one third of America's silk textiles were made in Philadelphia.


The Bust Series

by Chris Nelke


Location: Elevator Landing (Floors 2-8)

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The Bust Series

by Chris Nelke

These busts are reflective of those found of significant people throughout history, while also representing Philadelphia's industrial roots with the metal finishes.


Architectural Line Drawing I-VII

by Liz Heras


Location: Elevator Landing (Floors 2-8)

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Architectural Line Drawing I-VII

by Liz Heras

This collection of art found on each elevator bay on the guest floors reflect a difference place of architectural significance around Philadelphia. I. First Bank of the US II. Waterworks and Philadelphia Museum of Art III. One of the Buildings built for the World Fair in Fairmount Park. IV. Philadelphia Museum of Art V. Independence Hall VI. Philadelphia Museum of Art VII. Cathedral Basilica of Saints Peter and Paul. Pictured here is Architectural Line Drawing VII.


The Grace Series

by Elizabeth LaGumina


Location: Corridors (Floors 2-8)

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The Grace Series

by Elizabeth LaGumina

The glamour and mystique of famed Philadelphian, Grace Kelly, inspired these abstract series of female portraits. Grace Kelly was a very famous actress and a Pennsylvania resident who became the Princess of Monaco, she represents the remained and redefined elegance of the city and the princess within all women.


Manche de Café

by Miguel Horn


Location: Guest Room

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Manche de Café

by Miguel Horn

Manche de Café I is part of an ongoing series of studies of light and volumes of the human form. Each composition is part of a developmental process which sometimes evolve into sculptures. The tonality of the shadows is created by staining the canvas or paper repeatedly with coffee and espresso. Borders are constructed in graphite and charcoal for these stains which are continually breached by the irrepressible nature of the fluid. The result is a balance between the artist's intention and the response to the media.


Longwood Series in Green I,II,III,IV

by Hope Kahn


Location: Guest Room

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Longwood Series in Green I,II,III,IV

by Hope Kahn

Photographer Hope Kahn captures the modern geometric shapes of the world class garden known as Longwood. What is now Longwood Gardens was originally land belonging to William Penn in 1906, the Industrialist Pierre S. du Pont (1870-1954) purchased the property and created a private estate, and from 1906 until the 1930s, du Pont added extensively to the property. A world traveler from an early age, du Pont was often inspired to add features to the garden after attending world's fair. Mr. du Pont opened his estate to the public many days of the year during his occupancy and was even known, on a rare occasion, to personally (and anonymously) give tours of what is now a Philadelphia landmark.


The Symbol of Philadelphia

by Liz Heras


Location: Guest Room

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The Symbol of Philadelphia

by Liz Heras

The woman here holds the Symbol of Philadelphia, a gold coin that celebrates the State's history as the first Mint. The Mint was erected at 7th and Arch Streets and by March 1793, it delivered its first circulating coins. Philadelphia was then the nation's capital and Congress decided that American coins were to be made of gold, silver and copper, with $10, $5, $2.50, half dime and half cent pieces, in addition to the coin denominations we have now. Today Philadelphia still makes circulating coins of all denominations, commemorative coins as authorized by Congress, and produces the dies for stamping coins and medals.


Rider In The Snow

by Leander Fontaine


Location: Guest Room

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Rider In The Snow

by Leander Fontaine

Based on the First Continental Congress meeting in September 1774, in the Hall of Carpenters' Company, Philadelphia. This purely volunteer cavalry troop was the first organized in defense of the colonies. Today the Troop is certainly the oldest mounted military unit and quite possibly the oldest military unit of any kind that has been in continuous service to the Republic. This piece most commonly represents George Washington's crossing of the Delaware River on a snowy Christmas morning in 1776 during the American Revolutionary War.


Buddy

by Leander Fontaine


Location: Guest Room

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Buddy

by Leander Fontaine

Based on the First Continental Congress meeting in September 1774, in the Hall of Carpenters' Company, Philadelphia. This purely volunteer cavalry troop was the first organized in defense of the colonies. Today the Troop is certainly the oldest mounted military unit and quite possibly the oldest military unit of any kind that has been in continuous service to the Republic.


16 and Boxing

by Susan Nam


Location: Boardroom (Floors 2-4)

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16 and Boxing

by Susan Nam

This photograph represents the role boxing has played in Philadelphia's sports history. From famed Philadelphia boxer, Joe Frazier to the Rocky movie series including 2015's blockbuster hit CREED, boxing has always had a special significance to Philadelphia.